Friday, December 10, 2010

METHINKS I SHALL RUN FOR CONGRESS!

INTERESTING NUMBERS HERE.... NO WONDER GETTING RE-ELECTED IS THE #1 PRIORITY!


President’s Salary:

Effective January 1, 2001, the annual salary of the president of the United States was increased to $400,000 per year, including a $50,000 expense allowance. [ummmm do you think maybe Obama has exceeded his expense allowance?]


Presidential Pension:

Former presidents are offered a taxable lifetime pension equal to the annual rate of basic pay for the heads of executive branch departments, like the Cabinet Secretaries. This amount is set annually by Congress and is currently (in 2009) $193,400 per year. The pension starts the minute the president officially leaves office at noon on Inauguration Day. Widows of former presidents are provided with a $20,000 annual lifetime pension and mailing privileges, unless they choose to waive their right to the pension.


See the following link for things like transition expenses, medical, travel, secret service, staff and office allowance after leaving office.


http://usgovinfo.about.com/od/thepresidentandcabinet/a/presretirement.htm


Vice President’s Salary:

The salary of the vice president is currently (for 2009) $227,300



Congress: Leadership Members' Salary (2010)

Leaders of the House and Senate are paid a higher salary than rank-and-file members.



SENATE

Majority Party Leader - $193,400

Minority Party Leader - $193,400



HOUSE Leadership

Speaker of the House - $223,500

Majority Leader - $193,400

Minority Leader - $193,400

A cost-of-living-adjustment (COLA) increase takes effect annually unless Congress votes to not accept it. [yeah, right!]



Rank-and-File Members:

The current salary (2010) for rank-and-file members of the House and Senate is $174,000 per year


Members of Congress receive retirement and health benefits under the same plans available to other federal employees. They become vested after five years of full participation.


Members elected since 1984 are covered by the Federal Employees' Retirement System (FERS). Those elected prior to 1984 were covered by the Civil Service Retirement System (CSRS). In 1984 all members were given the option of remaining with CSRS or switching to FERS.


As it is for all other federal employees, congressional retirement is funded through taxes and the participants' contributions. Members of Congress under FERS contribute 1.3 percent of their salary into the FERS retirement plan and pay 6.2 percent of their salary in Social Security taxes.


Members of Congress are not eligible for a pension until they reach the age of 50, but only if they've completed 20 years of service. Members are eligible at any age after completing 25 years of service or after they reach the age of 62. Please also note that Members of Congress have to serve at least 5 years to even receive a pension.

WOULDN'T THAT BE NICE - 5 YEARS AND A FULL PENSION! YUP! THINK I'M GONNA RUN!

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